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When it comes to banking and credit, there are a lot of acronyms and terms that can be confusing. APR is one such acronym that can leave people scratching their heads. What does APR stand for? And what is it used for? Here’s everything you need to know about APR in banking. 

APR Definition

APR stands for “annual percentage rate.” It’s a term used in the banking and finance industry to describe the cost of borrowing money. APR includes both the interest rate and any fees charged by the lender. The APR is the true cost of taking out a loan, and it’s important to understand before you apply for a loan or credit card.

APR is different from the interest rate because it includes fees charged by the lender. The interest rate is just the cost of borrowing money, without any additional costs.

How is APR Calculated?

APR is calculated by adding the cost of borrowing money (the interest rate) to any fees charged by the lender. The resulting number is then expressed as a percentage.

For example, let’s say you take out a loan with an interest rate of 10%. If the lender also charges a 5% origination fee, your APR would be 15%.

Annual Percentage Yield (APY) vs. Annual Percentage Rate (APR)

APR is the true cost of borrowing money, but it’s important to understand the difference between APR and annual percentage yield (APY). While both rates take into account the interest rate and any fees, APR doesn’t consider any compounding interest that may take place during your loan, and APY does. 

APR Complexities

There are a few details about the APR that you should be aware of before taking out a loan or credit card.

First, the APR can be confusing and difficult to understand. It’s important to remember that the APR includes both the interest rate and any fees charged by the lender.

Second, the APR is always higher than the interest rate. This is because the APR includes the interest rate plus any fees charged by the lender.

Finally, the APR can sometimes be misleading. Some lenders advertise a low APR but then sneak high fees into the loan. It’s important to read the fine print and understand all of the terms and conditions before you agree to a loan or credit card.

What is a Good APR?

This answer depends on the type of card and your credit score. A good APR for a credit card is usually 10% or less. The Federal Reserve tracks average interest rates, so if your APR is lower than this, you have a good credit card. The best possible APR on a credit card is 0%, which you can get for an introductory period on many cards. If you always pay your credit card in full, you will not be charged any interest.

How Can CreditAssociates Help?

If debt is weighing you down, CreditAssociates can help. We’re America’s top-rated debt relief company, and we can help you reduce your debt by up to half or more. We have over 20 years of experience helping people get out of debt, and we can create a custom plan to fit your unique needs. Contact us today to learn how we can help you get rid of your debt and start on the path toward financial freedom. 

Common Questions about APR:

Do I have to pay the APR if I pay on time?

No, you only have to pay APR if you carry a balance on your credit card or loan. If you pay your balance in full every month, you will not be charged any interest or fees.

How do you avoid APR?

You can avoid APR by paying your balance in full every month. If you carry a balance, you will be charged interest and fees as outlined in your credit card or loan agreement.

Is the APR paid monthly?

No, APR is not paid monthly. APR is the annual cost of borrowing money, expressed as a percentage. You will be charged interest and fees on your outstanding balance every day, but the total amount you pay each year is your APR.

How do you apply APR to a loan?

APR is the true cost of taking out a loan, and it’s important to understand before you apply for a loan or credit card. APR includes both the interest rate and any fees charged by the lender. The APR is calculated by adding the cost of borrowing money (the interest rate) to any fees charged by the lender. The resulting number is then expressed as a percentage.